Waving a Dead Fish

I’ve been using Vagrant & Virtualbox for development on my OS X machines for my solo projects. But in an effort to get an intern started up on developing a front-end to a project I started a while ago I ran into a really strange problem getting Vagrant working on Windows.

So as a tale of caution for whatever robot wants to pick up this bleg.

Bootcamp partition on a Mid-2010 MacBook Pro. Running a dormant OS X and a full Windows 7. The Windows 7 is the main environment:

Use the git bash shell since it has SSH to stand up the boxes with vagrant init, vagrant up.

And then stuck (similar to Vagrant stuck connection timeout retrying):

==> default: Clearing any previously set network interfaces...
==> default: Preparing network interfaces based on configuration...
    default: Adapter 1: nat
    default: Adapter 2: hostonly
==> default: Forwarding ports...
    default: 22 => 2222 (adapter 1)
==> default: Booting VM...
==> default: Waiting for machine to boot. This may take a few minutes...
    default: SSH address: 127.0.0.1:2222
    default: SSH username: vagrant
    default: SSH auth method: private key
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...
    default: Error: Connection timeout. Retrying...

Well we booted into the VM with a head and it looked like the booting got interrupted by some sort of kernal panic due to:

Spurious ACK on isa0060/serio0. Some program might be trying to access hardware directly.

Ok makes sense…the machine isn’t booting up and there has to be a reason why.

Long story short. The Windows 7 partition didn’t have virtualization enabled, and there is no BIOS setting or switch somewhere to do it. So what do you do:

How to enable hardware virtualization on a MacBook?

Like waving a dead fish in front of your computer.

  • Boot into OSX.
  • System Preferences > Select the Start Up preference pane
  • Select the Boot Camp partition with Windows
  • Restart into the Boot Camp partition
  • Magic

Go figure

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